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中亞二二八登場
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亞魯司基

族群衝突, 是另人痛心疾首的罪行.

Ethnic Uzbeks gather near the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border ...

臺灣有人喜歡炒作二二八. 中亞二二八, 在Kyrgyzstan登場.

Kyrgyzstan orders deadly force to quell ethnic ...

Clothes pegs hang on a rope in the foreground ...

Kyrgyzstan南部, OSH城市, 二十五萬人口的城市, Kyrgyz 人對於少數的Uzbeks 人, 進行攻擊, 已經有幾百人死亡, Kyrgyz 人攻擊Uzbeks 人, 燒他們的住宅. 七萬五千Uzbeks 人, 放棄家園, 逃避種族謀殺.


Ethnic Uzbek gather near the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border ...

Kyrgyz forces given shoot to kill powers


根據國際媒體報導: Kyrgyz 軍隊向難民開槍, Uzbeks 邊防軍,才讓難民進入避難.

這件事情, 比二二八麻煩!

二二八是暴民攻擊外省人. 至少, 當時在臺灣, 軍隊鎮壓暴民. 在Kyrgyz 是軍隊向難民開槍, 這是與達扶一樣: 有政府與軍隊支持的種族消滅行為!

麥芽糖痛心看到中亞二二八登場. 希望這個報導, 可以停止臺灣有心人士, 對於二二八的炒作. 即使做不到, 也讓其他人, 看到種族消滅行為的可怕, 消化有心人士炒作的效果!

另外, 也請認為美國會派軍艦來臺灣的同胞, 看清楚: 蘇俄軍隊, 到Kyrgyz 是幹什麼?

吉國暴民濫殺 俄軍出動

吉爾吉斯暴民13日繼續在該國南部屠殺烏茲別克裔居民,不但縱火焚燒他們的房舍,還開槍濫殺,連老人和婦孺都不放過,釀成該國20年來最嚴重的族裔仇恨暴動。

超過7萬5千名烏茲別克人倉皇越過國境逃往烏茲別克,原本表明不干預的俄羅斯,也派兵進入吉國的俄軍基地待命。

烏茲別克急難部表示,逃到烏茲別克的烏裔難民都是老人和婦孺,許多人身上帶著槍傷。烏國已設立多個難民營收容他們。

吉爾吉斯第二大城歐什大部分城區已毀於暴民的炮火,大規模劫掠造成糧食短缺,到處都是黑煙火焰,來不及逃離的烏裔居民把自己鎖在家中。吉國臨時政府雖下令前往平亂的軍隊看到暴民格殺勿論,但仍無法平息情勢。

吉國臨時政府指控4月遭推翻的前總統巴基耶夫挑起動亂,意圖阻撓27日的新憲法公投和10月的選舉。當地一位官員說,巴基耶夫的黨羽同時攻擊吉裔和烏裔居民,刻意挑起這場動亂。

但流亡白俄羅斯的巴基耶夫否認介入暴動,表示臨時政府自己沒有好好保護人民。烏裔居民多半支持臨時政府,而南部許多吉爾吉斯人則支持巴基耶夫。

這場上周四爆發的動亂,至少已造成上百人喪生,1250人受傷。當地醫師表示,這個傷亡數字遠低於實際狀況,因為許多受傷的烏裔居民擔心被攻擊,根本不敢去醫院。

暴動已蔓延道當地另一個城市賈拉拉巴德,暴民攻擊當地軍營,取得更多軍火,再攻擊軍警。在吉國南部,軍警都處於守勢,不敢和暴民正面衝突。飛往當地的班機都已取消。

吉國要求俄羅斯派兵協助平亂,俄國12日原本表示暫時不會出兵。但是俄國國際傳真社13日報導,俄軍一個傘兵營13日已經抵達吉爾吉斯準備保護俄國在吉國的軍事設施

報導強調,「該傘兵營的任務是加強保護俄國軍事設施,並確保俄軍士兵及其家人的安全。」

【2010/06/14 聯合報】








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止善

美國又要恢復世界警察角色, 要求獨立旁觀者調查:


US envoy urges independent probe into Kyrgyz riots

Ethnic Uzbeks cross the Uzbek-Kyrgyz border as they leave Kyrgyzstan near the southern city of Osh, Friday, June 18, 2010. The United Nations said as AP – Ethnic Uzbeks cross the Uzbek-Kyrgyz border as they leave Kyrgyzstan near the southern city of Osh, Friday, …

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan – A top U.S. envoy called Saturday for an independent investigation into the violence that has devastated southern Kyrgyzstan, as amateur video emerged of unarmed Uzbeks gathering to defend their town during the attacks.

Prosecutors on Saturday charged Azimzhan Askarov, the head of a prominent human rights group who shot the video, with inciting ethnichatred. Askarov had accused the military of complicity in the bloody rampages that sent hundreds of thousands of Uzbeks fleeing for their lives.

The country's rights ombudsman Tursunbek Akun insisted the charges against Askarov were fabricated, and activists in Bishkek demonstrated before U.N. offices to demand his release.

Valentina Gritsenko, head of the Justice rights organization, said she feared Askarov was being tortured. He was detained with his brother on Tuesday in his southern hometown of Bazar-Korgon, colleagues told The Associated Press.

Entire Uzbek neighborhoods in southern Kyrgyzstan have been reduced to scorched ruins by rampaging mobs of ethnic Kyrgyz who forced nearly half of the region's roughly 800,000 Uzbeks to flee. Interim President Roza Otunbayeva says up to 2,000 people may have died in the clashes.

Kyrgyz authorities say the violence was sparked by supporters of ex-president Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who was toppled in April amid accusations of corruption. The U.N. has said the unrest appeared orchestrated, but has stopped short of assigning blame. Bakiyev, from exile, has denied any involvement.

Many ethnic Uzbeks also accused security forces of standing by or helping majority Kyrgyz mobs as they slaughtered Uzbeks and burned neighborhoods. Col. Iskander Ikramov, chief of the Kyrgyz military in the south, says the army didn't interfere because it is not a police force.

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Robert Blake met with Otunbayeva in Bishkek, the capital, on Saturday after touring several packed refugee camps in neighboring Uzbekistan.

Blake said the interim government should probe the violence and "such an investigation should be complemented by an international investigation by a credible international body."

He said the U.S. was working with the Kyrgyz government to make sure the refugees would be able to return home safely. The United States has released $32.2 million in aid, and Russia and France also sent planeloads of relief gear.

The Associated Press obtained Askarov's video, which was shot June 13 at the height of the rampages. It shows a few dozen Uzbeks pacing nervously around a square in Bazar-Korgon, an ethnic Uzbek settlement, apparently before rioters descended. Armed with only sticks and stones, several men are seen heading across the square as gun shots ring out and smoke rises in background.

"Are we going to just sit around and wait for them?" one man says in Uzbek. In a different shot, a voice colleagues confirm as Askarov's is heard saying "They're getting close."

"So many people have died over there. ... One armed group is gone; there is still another which has stayed. They're shooting from the direction of the prison, and Uzbeks have nothing but sticks one meter or half a meter long. There is smoke rising and I have no idea what's left there," Askarov says.

Destruction caused during the rampages was visible Saturday in parts of Bazar-Korgon, and Askarov's office was one of several gutted buildings.

The United Nations estimates 400,000 people have fled their homes and about 100,000 of them have enteredUzbekistan.

Thousands of ethnic Uzbeks massed this week in VLKSM (Veh-L-Kah-S-M), a village near Kyrgyzstan's main southern city of Osh. The village's name is a Russian-language acronym for the Soviet Communist Youth League, leftover from when this Central Asian nation was a Soviet republic.

Red Cross spokesman Christian Cardon said agency workers distributed oil and wheat flower to 12,750 displaced people in VLKSM on Saturday and handed out supplies to 18,750 displaced in Suretapa.

"The situation is still quite tense, but we're able to access all the places" where uprooted people have gathered, he said.

Employees from the Kyrgyz Red Crescent and ICRC workers monitor the distribution of aid, he said.

Many said they could not go back to their towns and live next to the people they accuse of attacking them.

"This is our nation, this is a holy land, but I can't live here any more," said Mukhabat Ergashova, a retiree who had taken shelter with dozens of others in a crowded tent.

"We are all witnesses to the fact that innocent citizens were fired upon from an armored personnel carrier by soldiers in military uniform. I don't know whether they were from the government or some third party, but they only shot at Uzbeks," said Sabir Khaidir, an ethnic Uzbek in Jalal-Abad.

Supplies of bread and rice from Uzbekistan kept the refugees from starvation. But many had to sleep in the open air, and overcrowding, bad sanitary conditions and a shortage of clean water were making many sick. Overwhelmed doctors struggled to treat outbreaks of diarrhea and other ailments with paltry medical supplies.

In Osh, the atmosphere remained tense, with barricades of burned out cars and debris blocking Uzbek neighborhoods. Otunbayeva, the interim leader, arrived Friday by helicopter in Osh's central square in the hope of conveying a sign of stability.

"We have to give hope that we shall restore the city, return all the refugees and create all the conditions for that," she said, wearing a bulletproof vest.

___

Goguelin was in Bazar-Korgon. Associated Press writer Peter Leonard in VLKSM, Kyrgyzstan, and Eliane Engeler in Geneva also contributed to this report.




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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100619/ap_on_re_as/as_kyrgyzstan


Ethnic Uzbeks in squalid camps fear returning home

Ethnic Uzbek women and children sit in a tent near Uzbek-Kyrgyz border in outskirts southern city of Osh, Friday, June 18, 2010. The United Nations saAP – Ethnic Uzbek women and children sit in a tent near Uzbek-Kyrgyz border in outskirts southern city of …

VLKSM, Kyrgyzstan – Ethnic Uzbeks sheltering in squalid tent camps say they don't have enough food or clean water but are terrified of going back to live alongside those they hold responsible for days of shootings, arson and sexual assaults.

That air of suspicion was rife Friday among the hundreds of refugees crowded into gray canvas tents on a patch of arid scrub in this Kyrgyzvillage near the border with Uzbekistan.

"Where can we go now? Our belief in the future is dead," said Mamlyakat Akramova, who lived in the center of Osh, Kyrgyzstan's second-largest city and the epicenter of the violence that broke out last week.

Entire Uzbek neighborhoods of southern Kyrgyzstan have been reduced to scorched ruins by rampaging mobs of ethnic Kyrgyz who forced nearly half of the region's roughly 800,000 Uzbeks to flee for their lives.

The U.N. says as many as 1 million people will need aid, and Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issued an appeal Friday for $71 million. "There are shortages of food, water and electricity in the affected areas, due to looting, lack of supply, and restrictions on movement," he said. "Hospitals and other institutions are running low on medical supplies."

The U.S. has released $32.2 million to meet immediate needs, and Russia and France sent planeloads of relief gear to Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, where many have sought shelter from the violence.

The official death toll stood at about 200, but interim President Roza Otunbayeva, who toured the ravaged region Friday, said the real number is likely 10 times higher — 2,000 — because many victims were buried quickly in keeping with Muslim tradition.

In the border village of VLKSM, where thousands of ethnic Uzbeks were living in tents or sleeping in the open air, many said they couldn't bring themselves to return to their homes and live next to their attackers.

"This is our nation, this is a holy land, but I can't live here any more," said Mukhabat Ergashova, a retiree who had taken shelter with dozens of other in a crowded tent.

Supplies of bread and rice were arriving from Uzbekistan, keeping the refugees from starvation. However, overcrowding, bad sanitary conditions and a shortage of clean water contributed to the spread of illness, and overwhelmed doctors struggled to treat outbreaks of diarrhea and other ailments with paltry medical supplies.

"Children are washing in the canal and drinking the water — they don't know any better, they're only children," Ergashova said.

Thousands massed this week in VLKSM (Veh-L-Kah-S-M), a village just miles from Osh whose name is a Russian-language acronym for the Soviet Communist Youth League in a throwback to the Soviet era.

The United Nations estimates 400,000 people have fled their homes in the country's south, and about 100,000 of them entered Uzbekistan.

By Friday, the huge crowds at the border had largely dispersed, with many taking refuge at the homes of fellow Uzbeks on the Kyrgyz side of the border, often sleeping more than a dozen to room. Tens of thousands of others have crossed into Uzbekistan and settled into camps there.

In Osh, the atmosphere remained tense, with barricades of burned out cars and debris blocking Uzbek neighborhoods. Still, some refugees risked coming back from Uzbekistan. Over the past few days, Uzbek border guards have placed quilted blankets over barbed wire at the border to allow refugees to cross back into Kyrgyzstan.

Otunbayeva, the interim leader, arrived Friday by helicopter in the city's central square in the hope of conveying a sign of stability. She wore a bulletproof vest.

"We have to give hope that we shall restore the city, return all the refugees and create all the conditions for that," she said.

Uzbeks in Osh complained the government was doing too little to alleviate their suffering and said they were relying on small amounts of aid from Uzbekistan. Many refugees complained humanitarian supplies were being blocked and stolen by Kyrgyz officials.

Although some aid was trickling into Uzbek areas near the border, there was little sign the supplies were reaching neighborhoods closer to the heart of Osh that have been blocked off with barricades.

Elisabeth Byrs of the U.N. humanitarian office said 30 aid flights have arrived in Osh and Jalal-Abad, carrying 780 tons of medical aid and relief goods. The World Food Program started distributing 100 tons of rations to 13,000 people in Osh — enough for two weeks.

Still, some groups expressed frustration that aid was held up because of worries over security.

"We have the first money, the suppliers and local cooperation partners to hand out the relief in a fair and impartial way," said DanChurchAid aid coordinator Joergen Thomsen. "But we do not have a safe access so we cannot start our work."

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Robert Blake, who visited a refugee camp in Uzbekistan about three miles (five kilometers) from the Kyrgyz border, was swamped Friday by crying refugees, mainly older women and children, complaining they were desperate to return home but too fearful to do so.

He said the U.S. was working with the Kyrgyz government to ensure the refugees would be able to return safely, and said there must be an investigation into the unrest.

Blake asked the refugees if they thought the violence had been organized, as the United Nations and Kyrgyz authorities have suggested.

"Yes, of course it was organized, it all happened so unexpectedly," answered Nasiba Mamyrdzhanova, a refugee from Osh who wore a traditional Uzbek long-sleeved dress with a bright headscarf.

Kyrgyz authorities have said the violence was sparked by associates of ex-president Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who was toppled in April amid accusations of corruption and a crackdown on the opposition. The U.N. has said the unrest appeared orchestrated but has stopped short of assigning blame.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in Washington that it was too early to say who was behind the violence, but added that "there certainly have been allegations of instigation that have to be taken seriously."

"Certainly the ouster of President Bakiyev some months ago left behind those who are still his loyalists and very much against the provisional government," she said.

Many ethnic Uzbeks accused security forces of standing by or helping ethnic-majority Kyrgyz mobs as they slaughtered people and burned neighborhoods.

"We are all witnesses to the fact that innocent citizens were fired upon from an armored personnel carrier by soldiers in military uniform. I don't know whether they were from the government or some third party, but they only shot at Uzbeks," said Sabir Khaidir, and ethnic Uzbek in Jalal-Abad.

Col. Iskander Ikramov, chief of the Kyrgyz military in the south, rejected allegations




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